From the incredible to the infinitesimal, it is the rich details of history that make Outlander the experience it is.  I found Outlander as an audiobook not because I’d ever heard of it, but because I’d taken Audible up on one of the special offers (Special Offer – Get Your First 3 Months at Audible for $7.49/month!) and was looking for the most bang for the listening buck.  The first book of Outlander?  Over 40 hours.  That’s a lot of weeding in the garden.

I had no idea it was a series.

Logged into Audible the following month to spend my little credit and lo!  Audible tells me people who liked Outlander liked Dragonfly in Amber.  Or Voyager.  Or…

Dear merciful heavens.. it’s a series!  Of books that spin out over 40 hours per book.  It’s absorbing, fascinating, and addicting.  If you already have a fascination with the 18th century…

Fortunately, I’m not the only one with this fascination.  What follows are reviews of other works (non-fiction) and my own analysis highlighting some of the period details that make Outlander the incredible body of work it is.

Rachel Hunter’s Quaker Mittens

Rachel Hunter’s Quaker Mittens

Mittens for a Friend, inspired by the Quaker, Rachel Hunter (created by Diana Gabaldon in her series Outlander)  are being released to coincide with World Quaker Day, October 2nd, 2016. These mittens feature the Quaker proverb You lift me, and I’ll lift thee, and we will rise together, which speaks to this year’s theme: Connecting Friends, Crossing Cultures and Changing
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18th Century Economics: Morality and Perversity

18th Century Economics: Morality and Perversity

Over 15 million people have viewed the info graphic by  Michael Norton and Dan Ariely, professors of the business schools of Harvard and Duke, titled Wealth Inequality in America.  If you’re not one of them.. here ’tis: If you’re looking for someone to blame for this don’t blame Adam Smith. Famous for his Wealth of Nations published
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Quakers Reflections: the sustainability of selfishness

Quakers Reflections: the sustainability of selfishness

In the blog Among Friends, written by Quakers, John Edminster attributes global warming, or climate change, to selfishness.  And he certainly has a point.. most of us are, at some level, selfish.  “Power-rich or power-poor, He declares, we all combine to maintain this scapegoating Me-first and Us-first culture out of which arises this selfish ravaging of the earth..” Unfortunately he
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Poop, Piles, and Parasites: Outlander and Outhouses

Poop, Piles, and Parasites: Outlander and Outhouses

There’s only one time a year when people lock their cars in Vermont… when the zucchini  come in.  Zucchini are notorious for growing from the sensible size of interesting man bits into something more befitting  a waterhorse in an hour.  Jack had his magic beans, Vermont has zucchini.  You can ruin friendships, to say nothing of
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Packing for MOBY Seattle: what to wear, what to wear..

“A man,” wrote Henry David Thoreau “who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period.”  This is, I believe, sound advice right up until you pull the
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Quakers and Jury Duty

Quakers and Jury Duty

The yellow postcard from the Jury Administration Office calling me to serve is faced with the State of Vermont’s court seal, a crudely rendered seated woman holding a staff and a set of scales topping the motto Lex Regnet Fi At Justitia. Which I translated, after discovering “Fi At” is actually “Fiat,” through google’s translator
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Something to Wear: a man’s 18th century linen shirt

Something to Wear: a man’s 18th century linen shirt

Six months ago I bought six yards of linen.  It’s a decent quality linen, and six yards of it, at 64″ in width, is a gracious plenty of linen.  Enough, more than enough since that was the plan, to make a woman’s 18th century shift and a man’s 18th century shirt.  Twice over, since I
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To make a Ragou of Veal or Lamb

To make a Ragou of Veal or Lamb

There’s no denying the convenience and overwhelming abundance of the meat case at the grocery store.  The large market to the north of us has a case running half the width of the store, refrigerated meats on one side, frozen on the other, and that doesn’t include the fish or deli counters.  Truely it is unlikely
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Coffee, Tea, and a Recipe for Life

Coffee, Tea, and a Recipe for Life

A friend of mine passed away, unexpectedly and very young, a few months ago.  This was a woman who held down two, sometimes three, jobs to support her family, kept a garden, and was, always, tired. Yet she managed to maintain a certain standard of gracious living, and a blog to go with it.  She
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Free Country by George Mahood : Penniless Adventures.

Free Country by George Mahood : Penniless Adventures.

I never would have read this unlikely book if it hadn’t appeared, randomly, as an Amazon suggestion.  And now, I can’t recommend it highly enough. It is such a comfort to know other people are every bit as silly as you are. In the interests of full disclosure while I did not start the trip off
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