Warning: Declaration of WPPopularPostsWidget::update($new_instance) should be compatible with WP_Widget::update($new_instance, $old_instance) in /homepages/43/d88895514/htdocs/Outlander/wp-content/plugins/wp-popular-posts/popularposts.php on line 93
Outlander Adventures Recreating the 18th Century Outlander Adventures: Experiencing the 18th Century
Time Travel with Lemons: Recipes for Lemon Curd

Time Travel with Lemons: Recipes for Lemon Curd

Flora MacDonald recently reviewed Outlander Adventures, and frankly, she found the adventures a bit wanting in redeeming social value. She was also quite critical of the research commenting “Lemons were not “hugely popular” in 18th century cooking. In fact, citrus fruits were a very rare commodity. Do you not recall the scene in which Roger, upon
read more

The Cup Half Full: 18th Century Chocolate

The Cup Half Full: 18th Century Chocolate

There’s so much you can blame on Outlander. For example, my new obsession with hot chocolate.  Had I never found Outlander I would never have found Outlander Kitchen and her interpretation of Hot Chocolate. You’d think, as a denizen of northern New England, I’d have grown up on hot chocolate, and you’d be right.  A day
read more

Staying True to Outlander: A Lace Shawl for Amanda Claire MacKenzie

Staying True to Outlander: A Lace Shawl for Amanda Claire MacKenzie

 For decades, including when I was visiting museums on school trips, 18th century costuming included the ubiquitous plain brown knit shawl.  In those days costumes also included zippers, machine sewn seams, and occasionally, sneakers. Today reinactors are encouraged to create their character with as much historically accurate detail as possible, making sure any visible seams
read more

A Bonnie Scottish Bonnet

A Bonnie Scottish Bonnet

Knitting was just made for audio books, but Outlander, or rather the 18th century, is woefully short of knitted garment inspiration. It isn’t that they didn’t know how to knit a garment, small shirts were knit for infants and children, but knitwear was not fashionable.  Furthermore, home knitters during this period can barely keep their
read more

Even More Indigo: River Run Blue

Even More Indigo: River Run Blue

Thanks to Outlander this summer I grew Japanese indigo in my garden.  To be truthful, I didn’t have a whole lot of faith in the roughly one square yard of indigo plants yielding very much color, or any color at all if I’m being honest, so I ordered a neat little kit which makes a
read more

Poetry Mittens: Useful Beauty (and patterns)

Poetry Mittens: Useful Beauty (and patterns)

“They will habitually prefer the useful to the beautiful and insist the beautiful be useful.”   Alexis de Tocqueville’s observation on New Englanders. Poetry mittens, designed to show a young woman’s skill in needlework, her piety, and her ability to read, appear at the end of the 18th and early 19th century.  I like to
read more

Yan Tan Tethera: Counting Sheep in Poetry Mittens

Yan Tan Tethera: Counting Sheep in Poetry Mittens

Yan Tan Tethera is a rhyming counting system used by shepherds in the north and highlands and immortalized in the folk song the The Lincolnshire Shepherd (which is available on iTunes, much to my surprise) or  you can hear it on youtube. I like to think Mac would have heard this rhyming count as he exercised the
read more

Toilet of Flora Olive Oil Soap c. 1779

Toilet of Flora Olive Oil Soap c. 1779

The Toilet of Flora has an entire chapter on Wash-Balls, most of which call for using “the best White Soap” in the ingredient list.  Fortunately, she provides a recipe for White Soap: This foap is made with one part of the Lees of Spanifh Pot-afh and Quick-lime, to two parts of Oil of Olives or
read more

Colonial Blueberry and Blackberry Cordials

Colonial Blueberry and Blackberry Cordials

I have a confession to make.  I don’t like whisky.  And as if that isn’t bad enough, I don’t care for red wine or brandy either. I’m going to get drummed out of the Outlander Fan Club.  I just know it. Fortunately this year I’m buried under a bumper crop of berries.  The blueberries are
read more

The Time Traveler’s Dye: Jewelweed

The Time Traveler’s Dye: Jewelweed

Jewelweed grows from southern Canada to Oklahoma and is often called “touch-me-not” for its exploding seed pods.  As a medicinal, jewelweed is a topical remedy for poison ivy, poison oak, nettle stings and insect bites. It also makes a user friendly introduction to natural dying. Jewelweed will produce color ranging from a lovely peach to
read more

 
Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: