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Outlander Adventures 18th century recipes Outlander Adventures: Experiencing the 18th Century
18th Century Spices: Ginger

18th Century Spices: Ginger

While I haven’t fallen through any stones lately I have 18th century days. And this was definitely one of those days.  Fresh ginger root is, along with lemons, one of those basics we just expect to find in the grocery.  In fact, it is one of those items you’d have expected to find in a marginally stocked store
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A Taste of the 18th Century: Spruce Gum

A Taste of the 18th Century: Spruce Gum

Here’s something to chew on: Outlander’s characters will encounter every major development in chewing gum.. from chewing resins in the 18th century, to chicle based gums during and prior to WWII, to the butadiene-based synthetic rubber which has been used to make gum since the 1960s… all within the first three books. It must be a uniquely
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18th Century Ginger Beer.. the improvement on Lizzie’s Hellbrew

18th Century Ginger Beer.. the improvement on Lizzie’s Hellbrew

The 18th century householder was on a first name basis with two things rarely found in a modern kitchen: patience, and active yeast fermentation. Since this is New England, and New England is not a warm and cozy place a good 8 months out of the year, chances are your average householder was quite friendly with
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An 18th Century Gardens ‘scape

An 18th Century Gardens ‘scape

Yet another adventure we can blame on Outlander.. this time we find ourselves in the 18th century garden armed with.. garlic. At Castle Leoch Claire, having landed unceremoniously in the 18th century, finds herself put to work in the garden planting garlic.  Garlic is one allium, or member of the onion family, I haven’t tried growing in my
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Color Coded Seed Packet Key

Color Coded Seed Packet Key

MOBY is Coming! And obviously a certain amount of celebration needs to take place, right? To celebrate I am carrying “business cards” of seed packets.  I researched these varieties carefully so they would be as authentic as possible to the experience of a late 18th century American kitchen garden, and these varieties are compatible with small spaces,
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18th Century Pocket Soup and other portable comestibles

18th Century Pocket Soup and other portable comestibles

The whole world is counting down the days to the release of Diana’s latest in the Outlander series: Written in My Own Heart’s Blood and I’m among the lucky ones who have a ticket to the book’s launch in Seattle.  Which means I’ll be journeying from Vermont clear across the country to Seattle. A perfectly mind-boggling distance,
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Signs of Spring in the 18th Century: Hot Cross Buns

Signs of Spring in the 18th Century: Hot Cross Buns

Once they were one a penny, or two a penny, but that was two centuries ago. Given the passage of time, the price, now one for two dollars, sounds both dear, and quite reasonable.  And so every spring, the week or two before Easter,  we go looking for hot cross buns. If we were in
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Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Cimarron Lettuce

Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Cimarron Lettuce

Lettuce Rejoice! Lettuce is one of the oldest known vegetables, and, surprisingly, is a member of the daisy and thistle family… how’s that for a Scottish connection?  The Ancient Greeks believed lettuce induced sleep, so served it at the end of a meal until Emperor Domitian (81-96 AD) started serving it at the beginning of
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Claire’s Wee 18th Century Garden: The New England Pie Pumpkin

Claire’s Wee 18th Century Garden: The New England Pie Pumpkin

Pie in the sky The word squash comes from an Algonquin word, askutasquash, which describes something eaten “green” or “unripe.”  While we now associate green squash with summer squashes all squashes, which includes what today we call pumpkins and winter squash, can be eaten “green” if picked young enough, around the size of a softball.  The New England Pie
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Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Carrots

Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Carrots

Getting Carrot Away! Carrots have a pretty exciting history in their own right. In fact, there’s an entire website dedicated to carrot history.. should you want to read their extensive research into the origins of the lowly carrot. It’s believed carrots appeared some 5000 years ago in Middle Asia and slowly spread across the Mediterranean.
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