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Outlander Adventures 18th century garden Outlander Adventures: Experiencing the 18th Century
An 18th Century Gardens ‘scape

An 18th Century Gardens ‘scape

Yet another adventure we can blame on Outlander.. this time we find ourselves in the 18th century garden armed with.. garlic. At Castle Leoch Claire, having landed unceremoniously in the 18th century, finds herself put to work in the garden planting garlic.  Garlic is one allium, or member of the onion family, I haven’t tried growing in my
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Color Coded Seed Packet Key

Color Coded Seed Packet Key

MOBY is Coming! And obviously a certain amount of celebration needs to take place, right? To celebrate I am carrying “business cards” of seed packets.  I researched these varieties carefully so they would be as authentic as possible to the experience of a late 18th century American kitchen garden, and these varieties are compatible with small spaces,
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Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Cimarron Lettuce

Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Cimarron Lettuce

Lettuce Rejoice! Lettuce is one of the oldest known vegetables, and, surprisingly, is a member of the daisy and thistle family… how’s that for a Scottish connection?  The Ancient Greeks believed lettuce induced sleep, so served it at the end of a meal until Emperor Domitian (81-96 AD) started serving it at the beginning of
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Claire’s Wee 18th Century Garden: The New England Pie Pumpkin

Claire’s Wee 18th Century Garden: The New England Pie Pumpkin

Pie in the sky The word squash comes from an Algonquin word, askutasquash, which describes something eaten “green” or “unripe.”  While we now associate green squash with summer squashes all squashes, which includes what today we call pumpkins and winter squash, can be eaten “green” if picked young enough, around the size of a softball.  The New England Pie
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Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Carrots

Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Carrots

Getting Carrot Away! Carrots have a pretty exciting history in their own right. In fact, there’s an entire website dedicated to carrot history.. should you want to read their extensive research into the origins of the lowly carrot. It’s believed carrots appeared some 5000 years ago in Middle Asia and slowly spread across the Mediterranean.
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Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Monstrueux De Viroflay Spinach

Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Monstrueux De Viroflay Spinach

It’s Good For You And tasty too. Spinach pops up in Europe in the 1300s, likely coming from Spanish traders who in turn brought it from Asian and Mediterranean sources. it’s growth pattern, which makes it one of the first vegetables to appear in the spring, made it very popular, and it appears in one
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Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Black Spanish Round Radish

Claire’s 18th Century Garden: Black Spanish Round Radish

Oh Radish! Today we see radishes in Asian cuisine, or relegated to the lowly position of garnish, cut into cute rose shapes. It makes sense radishes play a role in Asian dishes, the plant appears to have originated in China.  In the western world it was the Greeks who brought the radish to Europe, likely through
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Claire’s Wee 18th Century Garden: Swiss Chard

Claire’s Wee 18th Century Garden: Swiss Chard

Jefferson’s White Beet Contrary to popular belief, especially in the United States, chard did not originate with the Swiss.  Technically, “chards” are blanched artichoke leaves similar to cardoons, and, not surprisingly, chard is a corruption of the French word for cardoon.. so chard means different things in different countries.  In the United States  Swiss chard is actually
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Claire’s Wee Garden: Beets in the 18th century garden

Claire’s Wee Garden: Beets in the 18th century garden

You’ve Got The Beet! Wild beets are not the sweet round balls we’ve come to expect. Beets are native to the coast of western Europe and the Mediterranean,  growing only a few hundred yards from the high tide mark, and were first gathered as a forage crop for their spring greens beets, not their roots.
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