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Outlander Adventures Outlander recipes of the 18th century Outlander Adventures: Experiencing the 18th Century
18th Century Spices: Ginger

18th Century Spices: Ginger

While I haven’t fallen through any stones lately I have 18th century days. And this was definitely one of those days.  Fresh ginger root is, along with lemons, one of those basics we just expect to find in the grocery.  In fact, it is one of those items you’d have expected to find in a marginally stocked store
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A Taste of the 18th Century: Spruce Gum

A Taste of the 18th Century: Spruce Gum

Here’s something to chew on: Outlander’s characters will encounter every major development in chewing gum.. from chewing resins in the 18th century, to chicle based gums during and prior to WWII, to the butadiene-based synthetic rubber which has been used to make gum since the 1960s… all within the first three books. It must be a uniquely
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18th Century Ginger Beer.. the improvement on Lizzie’s Hellbrew

18th Century Ginger Beer.. the improvement on Lizzie’s Hellbrew

The 18th century householder was on a first name basis with two things rarely found in a modern kitchen: patience, and active yeast fermentation. Since this is New England, and New England is not a warm and cozy place a good 8 months out of the year, chances are your average householder was quite friendly with
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An 18th Century Gardens ‘scape

An 18th Century Gardens ‘scape

Yet another adventure we can blame on Outlander.. this time we find ourselves in the 18th century garden armed with.. garlic. At Castle Leoch Claire, having landed unceremoniously in the 18th century, finds herself put to work in the garden planting garlic.  Garlic is one allium, or member of the onion family, I haven’t tried growing in my
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18th Century Pocket Soup and other portable comestibles

18th Century Pocket Soup and other portable comestibles

The whole world is counting down the days to the release of Diana’s latest in the Outlander series: Written in My Own Heart’s Blood and I’m among the lucky ones who have a ticket to the book’s launch in Seattle.  Which means I’ll be journeying from Vermont clear across the country to Seattle. A perfectly mind-boggling distance,
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Signs of Spring in the 18th Century: Hot Cross Buns

Signs of Spring in the 18th Century: Hot Cross Buns

Once they were one a penny, or two a penny, but that was two centuries ago. Given the passage of time, the price, now one for two dollars, sounds both dear, and quite reasonable.  And so every spring, the week or two before Easter,  we go looking for hot cross buns. If we were in
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Mrs. McLintock’s Receipts: To make a Soup

Mrs. McLintock’s Receipts: To make a Soup

Sometime in the 18th century a clever soul decided if the dish was titled “The New England Boiled Dinner,” this might do something to enliven a meal of meat boiled in broth with root vegetables. Alas, as my California bred husband would morosely tell you.. it didn’t. The New England Boiled dinner is a towering
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Soup from the cellars: Vermont Farm Cheddar Cheese Soup

Soup from the cellars: Vermont Farm Cheddar Cheese Soup

Yesterday I reached into the potato bin and pulled out my last two potatoes.  The nice thing about running out of potatoes around Groundhog Day is they’re still as firm and crisp as when pulled them from the soil four or more months ago.  By April potatoes start turning soft and sprouting. The bad thing
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To make a Ragou of Veal or Lamb

To make a Ragou of Veal or Lamb

There’s no denying the convenience and overwhelming abundance of the meat case at the grocery store.  The large market to the north of us has a case running half the width of the store, refrigerated meats on one side, frozen on the other, and that doesn’t include the fish or deli counters.  Truely it is unlikely
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A Lemon in Winter: Sunshine From a Crate

A Lemon in Winter: Sunshine From a Crate

Vicki, a fellow enthusiast from the Compuserv Writer’s Forum, has sent me a box of Meyer’s lemons from her backyard tree, and the experience of picking up a box of lemons at the post office was likely quite similar to what my great great (great great..) grandmother would have experienced in 1781 had a cousin
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